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Table 2 Qualitative analysis of studies with insufficient data sets

From: Review of scoliosis-specific exercise methods used to correct adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

Author and year Study design Interventions and dosages Results Qualitative discussion
Negrini et al. (2006b) [29] CCT Experimental: Scientific Exercises Approach to Scoliosis 2002 Version (1.5 h session every 2–3 months, 2 40 min sessions independent sessions at a local facility per week; 5 min independent exercise daily) Control: exercise per treating therapist (2–3 times a week for 45–90 min treatment sessions) Cobb angles improved post intervention only in the experimental group (p < .05). The difference in the number of patients requiring bracing was not statistically significant between groups It should be noted that the quantity of time the therapist spent with the experimental group was reported to be substantially less to the control group. The results of this study should be taken cautiously as much of the details of the methods are left out of the report. Therefore, there is a rather large risk of bias in the study methods.
Negrini et al. (2008) [31] CCT Experimental: Scientific Exercises Approach to Scoliosis 2002 Version (1.5 h session every 2–3 months, 2 40 min sessions independent sessions at a local facility per week; 5 min independent exercise daily) Control: exercise per treating therapist (2–3 times a week for 45–90 min treatment sessions) 23.5% of patients in the SEAS group improved while 11.8% worsened in terms of Cobb angles (p < .05). 11.1% of patients in the control group improved while 13.9% worsened. The significant changes in Cobb angles for the intervention group can not be considered clinically significant as they likely did not exceed measurement error.